SPECIAL EVENTS

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Palazzo
Chiaramonte-Steri

Opening

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Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri

Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri is one of the most important historical palaces in Palermo.
It is located at Piazza Marina, a square in the historic centre of the city, known for the biggest Ficus macrophylla in Europe.
The palace was built starting from 1307 and, originally, was the house of the Chiaramonte family, from which it took the name. In the 15th century the palace became the house of the Sicilian viceroys; later it was home to the Royal Customs and, from 1600 to the end of the 18th century, it housed the Holy Inquisition Tribunal.
Palazzo Chiaramonte-Steri was restored in the 20th century and since 1984 is the most famous building of the University of Palermo, house of the Rector’s office and of the famous painting “La Vucciria” by Renato Guttuso.

Photocredits: http://et2016.deim.unipa.it/web/luoghi.php
Link: http://www.musei.unipa.it/steri.html

Palazzo Fatta

Philological and cartographic information, combined with ancient and recent findings in the subsoil adjacent to the area where the palace stands, lead to the hypothesis that part of this is based on very ancient structures that, in all probability, were part of the defense Arab city.
After the internal harbor had been built up to the sixteenth century, due essentially to the detritus brought by the Kemonia and Papireto streams, the so-called “Navy Plan” was formed, an urban void that has remained largely unpublished to this day. The first urbanization in the Palazzo area can be dated between the 16th and 17th centuries, when the cartography began to represent some constructions along the western side of the Plan.
It was an aggregation of buildings of modest size and architectural quality, which gradually became organized in courtly residences thanks to urban regulations that allowed the acquisition of houses and warehouses for the sole purpose of creating buildings and improving the quality of the city.
We know of a seventeenth-century Domus Magna, which had already belonged to noble families and was enlarged several times, which was further enriched in 1731-1733 when the new owner, Lucio Denti of Piraino, Prince of Castellazzo, raised and unified the existing factories; he added on the free head a large terrace on arched portico, able to give the building a strong architectural characterization and a comfortable view of the Navy Floor, a place for party shows, but also for the horrific public executions. The chronicles of the time refer to how Viceroy was repeatedly invited to attend the street demonstrations. Salvatore Calderone, baron of Baucina, bought the palace in 1769, embellishing it with those works of great value that can still be admired today, especially the dance hall, called “the Gallery”.
This was decorated with a basque panel decorated with rococo motifs, large painted overlays within complex golden baroque frames and majolica floors produced in Naples, as well as other rooms, from the living room adjacent to the alcove, also equipped with painted paintings. For the ceiling of the gallery Antonio Manno was called, considered the most successful pupil of Vito D’Anna in those years that failed; he created and signed a striking decorative arrangement composed of the central scene within an elegant stucco and gold frame in which the virtues of the family were exalted, surrounded by compartments with allegorical themes and architectural elements.

The autograph sketch of the work has recently been found, which we know served at Manno to obtain the much desired admission at the Accademia di San Luca in Rome and the subsequent appointment as an Academician. It is due to Francesco and Giovanni Fatta, barons of the Fratta, who came into possession of the building in 1857, the configuration of the current volume, resulting from the completion of the third floor and recomposition according to a unified design of the elevations: iconographies of the mid-nineteenth century show with all evidence the presence of two building units recognizable in autonomous architectural characters. The need for renewal imposed the replacement of shelves, railings, frames, exhibitions and other baroque elements with the simple and pure lines of the neoclassical taste that had long established itself in the city.
The new altimetric layout of the square, designed by G. B. F. Basile, forced the closing of the high portico under the terrace. Lastly, Ernesto Basile’s interventions of 1908 can be considered significant, both in the reconfiguration of the entrance hall where they can still admire ferrate, posters, stained glass and coffered ceiling, and in the finishes of the large well staircase. Recent restoration interventions have allowed us to rediscover and reproduce the polychrome of the exteriors that the maintenance of a century had hidden, but not canceled: from the white stucco of the upper floors, to the rich gray-blue stucco on the ground floor, to the azure lapis lazuli all The interior of the rosettes that decorate the facade above the terrace are all elements that, with the measured elegance of the shapes, contribute to the qualification of the urban surroundings.

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The Botanical Garden of the University of Palermo

“en plein air museum”

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The Botanical Garden of the University of Palermo

The Botanical Garden of the University of Palermo is one of the most important academic institutions in Italy.
Considered a huge open-air museum, it boasts over two hundred years of activity that allowed it to be studied in Sicily, Europe and across the Mediterranean sea, of countless plant species, many of which originate in tropical and subtropical regions .
The peculiarity of this Garden is today represented by the great richness of host species that make it a very rich place of different flora expressions.
It is part of the Museum System Services Center of the University of Palermo.

Photocredits: http://ortobotanico.unipa.it/foto.html
Link: http://ortobotanico.unipa.it/

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